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Metro Advance Apartments & Hotel Darwin - Darwin Aviation Museum

The Darwin Aviation Museum houses award winning displays  including a B-52 bomber. The museum illustrates the aviation history of the Northern Territory.

Darwin Aviation Museum

Darwin Aviation Museum


For aviation buffs this museum is well worth the visit.


The Darwin Aviation Museum is an accredited tourism attraction with award winning displays. There are 19 aircraft including a B-52 bomber (one of only two on display outside of the U.S.), 21 engines and 38 major displays including relics of crashed aircraft.


Don’t Miss these Displays at Darwin Aviation Museum


The museum has 19 civil and military aircraft on display including a B-52 Mitchell Bomber (one of the few surviving in the world), a replica Spitfire, Mirage, Avon Sabre, a Royal Australian Navy Wessex helicopter that assisted in the clean-up of Darwin after Cyclone Tracy, F-111C, the legendary B52 Bomber and many more.


In addition the museum displays many engines and relics of crashed aircraft.


On 19 February 1942, 188 Japanese planes bombed Darwin in two air raids. One of those planes crash-landed on Melville Island to Darwin’s north, and its pilot was captured by a local Aboriginal man. You can see the plane at the museum.


Footage exists and can be viewed at the museum of the only known colour film of the Bombing of Darwin.


The museum also showcases pioneer female aviators including Amy Johnston, the first female pilot to fly alone from Britain to Australia in 1930.


General Information


Located 8 kilometres from the city centre, the museum is accessible by public bus (numbers 8 and 5). Alternatively, take a taxi from Metro Advance Apartments and Hotel or drive and park at the museum.


There is a small air-conditioned café onsite and a gift shop.


The museum is open 9am – 5pm every day except Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years Day and Good Friday.


Current admission prices are available on the museum’s website.


Read more about the Darwin Aviation Museum here